10/28/16 – Artifact for Portfolio

critical thinking – synthesis, podcast showed opposing points of view- modes and media- podcast had oral, and non-oral communication with images

In a project assignment, “The Values of Science,” the objective was to create an argument regarding the rhetorical function of the values of two different texts, one of which had to be from the assigned readings of the course. The synthesis of the two chosen texts were to emphasize the chosen value, and then a presentation was to be created to state your argument in any chosen mode.

I chose to work with a group of three other classmates, and we collectively decided to show our work through a podcast. Our chosen value was hope; we used the works “Waiting for Light” by Jake Abrahamson and a commercial from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital that was mainly about childhood cancer and the research and work that goes on behind it. We set up an argument were I advocated how hope was shown in “Waiting for Light,” another classmate advocated the same value in the commercial, another person in my group represented the counterargument against hope and science, while the last person acted as a mediator. This podcast included pictures with quotes from the works we were using. *INSERT SCREENSHOT*

 

10/17/16 – Reflection of The Values of Science

Reflection of this project is posted under the Values of Science page

10/2/16 – Revision of “A Picture is Worth A Thousand Words”

Original text:

Everyone has heard the saying “a picture is worth a thousand words,” but how does one image actually impact a person, their feelings, and their actions? How can one single picture elicit so many different thoughts? By just targeting one of the five senses, a picture can spark an entire array of emotions, which can in-turn create a train of thought, and then those thoughts can inspire a set of actions. A simple picture can make the connection between being familiar with a concept to actually knowing and understanding that same concept. Visual learners comprise of over half of the world’s population (according to the Social Science Research Network, at least), so it would make sense that images are employed to successfully present different ideas, theories, and stories that might be easily confused or misunderstood with an explanation consisting solely of text.

Let’s take Eros Hoagland’s “Life in the Googleplex” for example. Hoagland uses a photo essay to describe what it is like to work at Google. Many people, or maybe just myself, think of Google as a high and mighty place where all information is stored, and the world is ruled there by a collection of some of the smartest people in the world. That doesn’t exactly sound like a playground to me. Google has a such a prominent connotation of  intelligence that it is hard to relate it to fun. This problem is exactly what Eros Hoagland addresses in his photo essay. The collection of pictures along with quirky comments and captions shows how laid-back and fun Google can actually be. He doesn’t rely just on words for his rhetoric; he utilizes pictures, so that everyone can understand and see what it is actually like working for Google. Hoagland’s pictures explain more to the public in just one glance than he ever could in words.

In photo essays, rhetoric thrives. A strategically placed photo can derive ethos, logos, and pathos from almost anyone. Whether using it for something argumentative, informative, or strictly for fun, an image can immediately draw its audience in. Pictures share a universal language, even if the actual captions are not in someone’s native tongue. This is why Eros Hoagland, along with countless others, choose to provide their information through images. They are easy to understand and a potent tool for whatever the author’s purpose. An involuntary chain reaction (described in the first paragraph, third sentence) starts whenever an image is processed and knowing how to harness this power creates rhetoric so powerful that it is almost impossible to resist. After all, seeing is believing, right?

Revised Text:

Everyone has heard the saying “a picture is worth a thousand words,” but how does one image actually impact a person, their feelings, and their actions? How can one single picture elicit so many different thoughts? By just targeting one of the five senses, a picture can spark an entire array of emotions, which can in-turn create a train of thought, and then those thoughts can inspire a set of actions. A simple picture can make the connection between being familiar with a concept to actually knowing and understanding that same concept. Visual learners comprise of over half of the world’s population (according to the Social Science Research Network, at least), so it would make sense that images are employed to successfully present different ideas, theories, and stories that might be easily confused or misunderstood with an explanation consisting solely of text. Another aspect of utilizing images into a rhetorical text includes something slightly less innocent; pictures can be manipulated and distorted into anything the author wishes it to be, and this also is a reason that rhetorical writers rely on photographs.

Let’s take Eros Hoagland’s “Life in the Googleplex” for example. Hoagland uses a photo essay to describe what it is like to work at Google. Many people, or maybe just myself, think of Google as a high and mighty place where all information is stored, and the world is ruled there by a collection of some of the smartest people in the world. That doesn’t exactly sound like a playground to me. Google has a such a prominent connotation of  intelligence that it is hard to relate it to fun. This problem is exactly what Eros Hoagland addresses in his photo essay. The collection of pictures along with quirky comments and captions shows how laid-back and fun Google can actually be. He doesn’t rely just on words for his rhetoric; he utilizes pictures, so that everyone can understand and see what it is actually like working for Google. Hoagland’s pictures explain more to the public in just one glance than he ever could in words.

On the other hand, though everyone would love to believe Hoagland’s description in “Life in the Googleplex,” it is very possible that the pictures he uses in his photo essay do not actually represent what reality is. Eros Hoagland’s purpose behind his piece is to convince his audience that Google is a fun, innovative, and happy place to be. He uses a collection of pictures to prove this, as described in the previous paragraph. Though these pictures are supposedly candid, there is a chance that Hoagland stages these pictures to really emphasize what he wants the audience to see. Whether choosing not to photograph some scenes or choosing a certain perspective that looks “happier,” photo essays are easily manipulated by their authors. Though somewhat immoral, this emphasizes how the photos are very valuable tools to have for rhetorical writer.

In photo essays, rhetoric thrives. A strategically placed photo can derive ethos, logos, and pathos from almost anyone. Whether using it for something argumentative, informative, or strictly for fun, an image can immediately draw its audience in. Pictures share a universal language, even if the actual captions are not in someone’s native tongue. This is why Eros Hoagland, along with countless others, choose to provide their information (whether accurate or not) through images. They are easy to understand and a potent tool for whatever the author’s purpose. An involuntary chain reaction (described in the first paragraph, third sentence) starts whenever an image is processed and knowing how to harness this power creates rhetoric so powerful that it is almost impossible to resist. After all, seeing is believing, right?

9/26/16- Transformation Project Implications

  1. This idea changes the way that scientists understand the thalamus and how it relates to sensory input.
  2. This argument changes the received understanding that the brain can not be manipulated by external forces (ex: mind control – in a very mild sense).
  3. This argument has real world consequences that could help scientists further understand the brain, so that research can be done to help further advance the quality of life (ex: understanding how the “bursting” cells work could help develop a better treatment for people with ADD, so that they could better focus their attention).

9/21/16 – Differences between Robot Articles

  • Georgia Tech article is significantly longer
  • Georgia Tech article uses more scientific language
  • Popular Science article is more of a “fun read,” while the GT one is more of an informative/research article
  • GT article shares specifics about the origin, process, and final product of their experiment with the robot
  • GT also shares the significance of such robot in much larger detail
  • GT is formal compared to the other because of things such as citations being present
  • GT shares how this robot can help us with further develop our own technology
  • Popular Science has very many advertisements on the page
  • GT has media contacts ( this is their form of advertisement)

9/16/16 – Peer Review for Spinning Science Project

Louis:

  • Rhetorical Awareness: Competent
  • Stance: Competent
  • Development of Ideas: Competent
  • Organization: Competent
  • Conventions: Developing
  • Design for Medium: Mature

Brandon:

  • Rhetorical Awareness: Competent
  • Stance: Competent
  • Development of Ideas: Mature
  • Organization: Mature
  • Conventions: Competent
  • Design for Medium: Competent

Because of peer review, I learned that everyone’s interpretation of a singular project is different. Thanks to my peers, I learned that I have solid ideas, but I need to work on my execution and organization. I feel as if I have so many ideas, but I need to work on better weaving them together.

Plan for Revision: Work on a better “flow” of ideas. Keep the main ideas of the project, but make sure they make sense as to where I placed them originally. Transition sentences need work. I have to make sure I don’t get too “wordy.” Better explanations in 3rd paragraph.

9/16/16- Reflection of Spinning Science Project

Posted under the Spinning Science Project on the page itself

9/11/16 – Introduction Draft for Spinning Science Project

Estee Lauder Perfectionist CP+R Wrinkle Lifting/Firming Serum Ad Video

The use of science (or rather scientific jargon) in advertisements is becoming more and more prominent in today’s society. As science continues to develop, it has gained a larger weight of importance to the general population. Therefore, science has been becoming a larger and larger part of advertisements. This use of scientific jargon has created a sense of trust; the “science” that is in the advertisement makes the public feel as if there is no way that the information is not true. An example of this comes from Estee Lauder’s commercial for the Perfectionist CP+R Wrinkle Lifting Serum. It was produced in 2012 to target an audience of those who want smoother, younger looking skin (which of course applies to almost any woman over the age of forty). The purpose of the ad is to convince viewers that their formula is the best way to obtain the best looking skin. This is where science comes into play. The use of technical words such as “in vitro testing of our CPR-75 technology” goes over the typical viewer’s realm of knowledge. Because the phrasing is so complicated, the audience assumes that the information must be true and the product is just as complex and advanced as the company proclaims it to be. The use of science in today’s advertisement system is not used to inform; it is used to deceive. Because of how technical and “advanced” the jargon is, audiences everywhere are tricked into believing that the advertisement is true, whether or not that is actually the case.

08/29/16 : Common First Week Video Reflection

  1. Describe your process. What steps did you find most effective? Least?

When making this project, the first step I took involved thinking about what modes of communication that I was comfortable and uncomfortable with. Once I decided which mode I was going to talk about, I made a general script and started filming the video itself. I found that having the script was very effective in making the video, but doing multiple takes was not the best way because I found that I would do something a little different each time, whether that be good or bad.

  1. What part of your project are you most satisfied with and why?

The part of my project that I was most satisfied with was the actual uploading and filming of the video. I have never previously had to post any type of videos online, and I was not sure that I was actually going to be able to post the video and the link publically. I managed to figure it out with a little help from my roommate, but I recorded and uploaded everything without a problem which was very satisfying to me.

  1. If you could redo any part of your process and/or final product, what would you change? Why?

Overall, I was satisfied with my process, but I would change the quality of the video in the final product. Even though my video was about my struggles with the use of electronic communication, I feel as if I could’ve managed to make a better quality video with a little bit more eloquence in the script/oral part of the project.

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